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Professor Jan Krämer

Professor Jan Krämer

Professor Jan Krämer has held the Chair of Internet and Telecommunications Business of the University of Passau since 2014. Moreover, he is a Research Fellow at the Centre on Regulation in Europe (CERRE), a Brussels-based think tank. Prior to that, he led the research group ‘Telecommunication Markets’ at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Professor Krämer is known for his research on the principle of net neutrality, which has been the subject of heated political, economic and legal debate across the globe. He has studied and conducted research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Boston University.

Professor Jan Krämer has held the Chair of Internet and Telecommunications Business of the University of Passau since 2014. Moreover, he is a Research Fellow at the Centre on Regulation in Europe (CERRE), a Brussels-based think tank. Prior to that, he led the research group ‘Telecommunication Markets’ at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Professor Krämer is known for his research on the principle of net neutrality, which has been the subject of heated political, economic and legal debate across the globe. He has studied and conducted research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Boston University.

Professor Jan Krämer about his contribution to Cyber<>Spaces and the reasons for his participation:

‘In Cyber<>Spaces I examine under which conditions and in what ways the principle of ‘net neutrality’ can be sensibly applied to the various dominant actors along the internet value chain.

Twitter, Facebook, Google, Amazon and others have become a fixture in our daily lives and therefore have a strong influence on the way we communicate and create value. Unlike the classic monopolies, such as those in the telecommunications and energy sectors, these giants of the internet are largely unregulated. Cyber<>Spaces creates an interdisciplinary forum for discussing and scrutinising the future regulatory framework for the internet economy. Only this will enable us to develop balanced and comprehensive recommendations for political decision-makers that do justice to the importance of the (data-driven) internet economy.’

Professor Krämer about the principle of net neutrality

Related research

Professor Krämer’s current research interests are on economic regulation of internet and telecommunications markets as well as digital ecosystems and data-driven business models. The CD.B research group ‘Data Neutrality & Open Access: Coherent Economic Policies for the Digital Economy’ is situated at his Chair.

  • Krämer, J., & Schnurr, D. (2018). Is there a need for platform regulation in the EU? Telecommunications Policy, 42(7), 514-529. doi:10.1016/j.telpol.2018.06.004 [JQ3: C; IF: 1.526; ABS: Grade 1; HB: 0.15]
  • Krämer, J., Schnurr, D., & Wohlfarth, M. (2018). Winners, Losers, and Facebook: The Role of Social Logins in the Online Advertising Ecosystem, Management Science, forthcoming.  https://doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2017.3012 [JQ3: A+; IF: 2.822; ABS: Grade 4*; HB: 1]
  • Krämer, J. & Wiewiorra, L. 2012. Network Neutrality and Congestion Sensitive Content Providers: Implications for Content Variety, Broadband Investment and Regulation. Information Systems Research, 23(4): 1303–1321.
  • Kourandi, F., Krämer, J. & Valletti, T. 2015. Net Neutrality, Exclusivity Contracts and Internet Fragmentation. Information Systems Research, 26(2): 320–338.

    More on Professor Krämer’s research

More Research Insights

[Translate to English:]

Social Logins, Fulfilment by Amazon, Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages: A team of researchers at the University of Passau has applied game theory models to analyse services offered by large online platforms. What may sound good, might come at a price...

In many cases, internet users benefit from the prominent display of certain content, a study finds.

Researchers from Passau and Namur, Belgium, have investigated discriminatory practices of online platforms such as sponsored search results and paid prominence. The research was commissioned by Brussels-based think tank CERRE.

Dr. Daniel Schnurr, information systems scholar at the University of Passau

In the video interview, Dr. Daniel Schnurr, information systems scholar at the University of Passau, speaks about the fallout of the Facebook data scandal and about how users develop a sense of value for their data.

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