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Professor Dirk Uffelmann

Professor Dirk Uffelmann

Professor Dirk Uffelmann has held the Chair of Slavic Literatures and Cultures of the University of Passau since 2006; he is one of the editors of Zeitschrift für Slavische Philologie and co-founder of the Passau Centre for eHumanities, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Moreover, he is the Vice Chairman of the German Association of Slavists and a Research Fellow of the Graduate School for East and South East European Studies of the universities of Munich and Regensburg. Previously, he held the posts of Lecturer at the University of Edinburgh (UK), at the University of Bergen (Norway), Western Michigan University (United States), as well as the post of...

Professor Dirk Uffelmann has held the Chair of Slavic Literatures and Cultures of the University of Passau since 2006; he is one of the editors of Zeitschrift für Slavische Philologie and co-founder of the Passau Centre for eHumanities, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Moreover, he is the Vice Chairman of the German Association of Slavists and a Research Fellow of the Graduate School for East and South East European Studies of the universities of Munich and Regensburg. Previously, he held the posts of Lecturer at the University of Edinburgh (UK), at the University of Bergen (Norway), Western Michigan University (United States), as well as the post of Senior Fellow at the University of Munich and the University of Cambridge (UK).

'Exploring power structures and mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in international internet relationships requires cultural, social and informational competencies as well as an expertise in law, business and economics. To me, the Cyber<>Spaces Cluster ideally integrates this knowledge base. The Slavistic contribution to the Cluster is a combined analysis of cultural discourse and informational networks. It focuses on the “Russian world” (Russkiy Mir), as propagandised by the Russian Federation, as well as rival constructs such as “Russian world two” or multiple “Russian cultures”. The discourse analysis is combined with a network analysis of centrifugal tendencies and the creation of echo chambers in the Russian-language internet (Runet).'

Related research

Professor Uffelmann focuses his research on postcolonial approaches to Russian (language) culture in relation to other post-Soviet cultures and cyber imperialism.

  • Uffelmann, D. 2016. The Imagined Geolinguistics of Ukraine. In M. Suslov & M. Bassin (Hrsg.), Eurasia 2.0: Post-Soviet Geopolitics in the Age of New Media:  249–273. Lanham, Maryland: Lexington.
  • Uffelmann, D. 2014. Is there a Russian Cyber Empire? In M. S. Gorham, I. Lunde & M. Paulsen (Hrsg.), Digital Russia: The Language, Culture, and Politics of New Media Communication: 266–284. London: Routledge.

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